Take Care of Those Baby Teeth | Ottawa Dentist

February is known as National Children’s Dental Health Month and this year’s theme is “Brush and clean in between to build a healthy smile”. Now, when we think about our little human’s teeth, we hardly think there is any reason to fret about them. But taking care of them now will also ensure the next set will come in healthy. As we settle into the second month of 2019, let’s focus in on the tiny smiles in our family and make sure they have the best year as well…

Fruits and veggies. The good thing about fruits and vegetables is that not only are they good for our bodies, but they are crunchy and full of water, two things that are ideal for a healthy smile. Saliva production helps to cleanse our mouths of cavity-causing bacteria naturally.

Stay away from the 3 S’s. There are three culprits in our dental health we should be aware of – sugars, starches and sticky foods. These three options for foods are always going to be a bad idea for your smile because not only does the sugar cause cavities, but sticky foods can cause these sugars to grab hold of your teeth. If you eat these foods, make sure to brush or rinse afterwards.

Daily dental care. We all know dental hygiene is necessary on a daily basis, regardless of the age. So, teach good dental habits early in order to ensure a lifetime of health smiles. Visiting the dentist early will also help to teach your little one that there is nothing to fear. It’s a family affair.

If you would like more information about National Children’s Dental Health Month, call Dr. Katia Doumit in Ottawa, Ontario at 613-232-8000 or visit www.lesplanadedental.com.

Dr. Doumit proudly serves Ottawa and all surrounding areas.

Let’s Celebrate International Eat an Apple Day! | Ottawa Dentist

Have you ever given your teacher an apple? Have you ever heard of the Welsh proverb, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”? Apples aren’t just randomly chosen to represent a teacher’s pet or a deterrent for going to the doctor, but there are actual health benefits that are bringing this delicious fruit to the forefront of healthy snack options. But did you know that these shiny apples are also helping you keep a health and shiny smile in the process? It’s true. Apples are not only healthy for our overall health, but also helps our mouths stay healthy in the process.

Apples are fantastic on a couple of levels – they are a delicious hand-held snack on the go and they help prevent lots of health issues. What kind of health issues? Believe it or not, apples can lend a hand with various stages of dementia and cancers, help lower cholesterol, aid in the symptoms of diabetes and of course helps when working on weight loss. And that’s not even including your smile!

When it comes to our smiles, the apple will have a dual line of defense against dental issues. Because apples are delightfully crispy, every bite you take gets into the places between your teeth a regular scrub can’t quite get to effectively. Apples also contain malic acid, which acts as a quick scrub on your teeth as you consume the juicy fruit. Speaking of juicy fruit, eating an apple will increase saliva production, and saliva helps naturally rinse our mouth of cavity-causing bacteria.

On September 17th we celebrate International Eat an Apple Day, so go ahead and snack on the greatest natural snack around. Don’t forget your teacher!

If you would like more information about the benefits of apples, call Dr. Katia Doumit in Ottawa, Ontario at 613-232-8000 or visit www.lesplanadedental.com.

Dr. Doumit proudly serves Ottawa and all surrounding areas.

MythBusters: Dental Health Edition | Ottawa Dentist

Are you someone that believes in myths? Do you believe them in all aspects in your life? Sometimes myths are fun and whimsical, but sometimes they can become an issue, especially when it comes to your health. Let’s take a look at some of the more common dental myths. What you believe may be doing more harm than good…

Sugar is responsible for tooth decay. While sugar certainly plays a huge role, it’s not exactly the only suspect. Acids produced by the naturally occurring bacteria in our mouth are to blame for plaque buildup that can lead to tooth decay.

White teeth are healthy. The natural color of the teeth varies from person to person and there are those with perfectly healthy teeth, but at the same time, theirs may be darker than those whose teeth aren’t as healthy.

Milk teeth don’t matter. While it’s true that they do eventually fall out, the state of milk teeth can predict their oral health later on in their life.

Bleaching is bad. In years past, bleaching was dangerous but these days, the materials used are pH neutral and are safe for the teeth.

Pregnant women can ignore bloody gums. Hormonal changes can cause bleeding gums but check with your dentist to be sure.

Flossing and rinsing are not important. Flossing is a necessary extra step to prevent the build-up of bacteria on the teeth, mainly in the areas where brushing alone can’t reach. The same goes for rinsing.

Bad breath means gum disease. While it is possible that bad breath may indicate that you have gum disease, it could be a sign of other health complications.

If you would like more information about dental myths, call Dr. Katia Doumit in Ottawa, Ontario at 613-232-8000 or visit www.lesplanadedental.com.

Dr. Doumit proudly serves Ottawa and all surrounding areas.

You Can Run, but You Can’t Hide | Ottawa Dentist

If you’re like most of us, before your teeth cleaning is time for a college cram session worth of dental hygiene. While cavities and plaque build-up may be what’s on your mind before a teeth cleaning, your dentist is looking for a whole lot more. Often, diseases will first be identified by the dentist during a regular examination. And unfortunately, can discover all of your bad habits. So, when coming up with “proof” you’re taking care of your teeth, think again…

Poor flossing habits. Sorry, but you can’t fool your dentist into thinking you floss daily by doing so the night before or morning of your visit.

Pregnancy. Nearly 40% of women will develop gingivitis during their pregnancy because of the changes in hormones. Some women will develop a deep red lump on their gums, but it’s completely benign and will go away after the pregnancy is over.

Thumb sucking. Children that suck their thumbs past the age of seven or eight may show significant changes to their bite or the position of their teeth.

Bad breath. Dentists are trained to identify different smells in breath as various scents can mean various health issues that may not have been diagnosed.

Eating disorders. Bulimia exhibits a very distinct pattern of tooth wear. Acid reflux and the use of antidepressants or mood-elevating drugs reduce the amount of saliva, also causing acid damage.

Oral cancer detection. Oral cancer symptoms: unexplained bleeding, white, red, or speckled patches, a change in the way your teeth fit together, swellings, thickenings, lumps or bumps or eroded areas on the mouth.

Soda & energy drinks. Teeth can be softened by sodas and other sugary beverages, making teeth more susceptible to chipping. Energy drinks are more acidic than soft drinks, causing even more damage to tooth enamel.

If you would like more information about dental examinations, call Dr. Katia Doumit in Ottawa, Ontario at 613-232-8000 or visit www.lesplanadedental.com.

Dr. Doumit proudly serves Ottawa and all surrounding areas.